HISTORICAL MARKERS

 Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana: This maker memorializes enslaved people who slave traders brought to Louisiana from locations outside of the United States. It is located on the Mississippi riverfront known as the Moonwalk and was placed by New Orleans Committee to Erect Markers on the Slave Trade in 2018.

Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana: This maker memorializes enslaved people who slave traders brought to Louisiana from locations outside of the United States. It is located on the Mississippi riverfront known as the Moonwalk and was placed by New Orleans Committee to Erect Markers on the Slave Trade in 2018. 

New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade: Located on the neutral ground at the intersection of Esplanade Avenue and Chartres Street in New Orleans, this historic marker, sheds light on the role of New Orleans during the domestic slave trade. It was erected by the New Orleans Committee to Erect Markers on the Slave Trade in 2018. 

Enslaved Africans:  Located in Algiers Point, on the Westbank of New Orleans, atop the levee and along the Mississippi River Trail, this historic marker can be reached from the intersection of Morgan Street and Bouny Street.  

In the 1720s, on land since eroded by the river, stood the barracks and other buildings that were part of the King’s Plantation.  There, enslaved Africans from West and West Central Africa, largely the Senegal-Gambia region, were held before being ferried across the river to be sold at slave auctions. The area of Algiers Point was also the home of the slaughterhouse and the powder magazine for New Orleans. This marker was placed by the Algiers Historical Society.          
  

Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana: This historic marker memorializes those who perished as well as those who survived the trans-Atlantic trade of enslaved Africans to Louisiana. As a port of entry, this site has been designated a “Site of Memory” associated with the UNESCO Slave Route Project. The marker is located at the Algiers Courthouse, on the Westbank of New Orleans, and placed by the Algiers Tricentennial Committee in 2019. 



Solomon Northup “12 Years a Slave: Located at the corner of Esplanade Avenue and Chartres Street, this marker denotes the site of the former site of Theophilus Freeman’s notorious slave pen (demolished after the Civil War) where Solomon Northup, a free man of color from New York, was sold into slavery in 1841. Northup told his story in his 1853 memoir “12 Years a Slave” and in the award-winning movie by the same name. The sculpture was erected by The Afro-Louisiana Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc.

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